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Is a larger transmission oil cooler needed in hotter climates?

 
Old 05-22-2019, 10:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Gigel View Post
1600 is very little imho when you have a family of 4 + 2 large dogs that are 100lbs each. passangers and bikes easily get to around 900+lbs and then the trailer a tongue weight of a 6300lbs trailer at say 650lbs. YOU GOT NO MORE ROOM FOR BEEER!!!

Hence whey everyone is telling you to get an F250.
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Old 05-22-2019, 11:01 PM
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Originally Posted by sholxgt View Post
Hence whey everyone is telling you to get an F250.
But "weight" there is more!! What if you add one of these air bag systems where you can inflate the bags. Wouldn't it be logical to assume that it should be able to support a few more lbs since some force is transferred from the leaf springs direct onto the axle ?
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Old 05-23-2019, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Gigel View Post
But "weight" there is more!! What if you add one of these air bag systems where you can inflate the bags. Wouldn't it be logical to assume that it should be able to support a few more lbs since some force is transferred from the leaf springs direct onto the axle ?
No. You cannot increase your tow or payload capacity. Recent discussion on that same question can be found in this thread

https://www.f150forum.com/f82/how-in...-limit-447473/

You want a super duty. If you plan on going on trips towing anywhere near 12k lbs, you want a 3/4 ton truck.

The most payload you can get from an F150 is going to be the heavy duty payload package, which requires an XL or a low level XLT and a longer wheelbase (so it tops out at trim level XLT in SCREW 6.5' bed 301a). But even that probably isn't really 'enough' truck for the job.

For a 12k-13k lb trailer, not to mention people and any other 'stuff' you'd travel with in the truck, 6-8 times a year (that's a lot)...get yourself a 3/4 ton truck. Get the right tool.

Last edited by blkZ28spt; 05-23-2019 at 08:56 AM.
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Gigel View Post
Its not that i need to tow that much... the trailer i'm planing on is dry 6300lbs the more important thing is the payload but i just cant believe that you cant get the max payload package on the higher up trims.
Sorry for the above, I just doubled back and realized I missed this post before making this post the first time.

Still, 6300 dry and then the final weight, and the weight distributing hitch, and passengers, and whatever else is in the truck...a 3/4 ton is probably a good idea...but a 3.5 liter with max tow and HDPP might be okay. As others already said, you need to have exact (and not conservative, realistic and err high) numbers for trailer and payload/tongue weight that you expect.


Originally Posted by Gigel View Post
1600 is very little imho when you have a family of 4 + 2 large dogs that are 100lbs each. passangers and bikes easily get to around 900+lbs and then the trailer a tongue weight of a 6300lbs trailer at say 650lbs. YOU GOT NO MORE ROOM FOR BEEER!!!
Exactly. 1,600 lbs does go fast for family travel with a decent trailer. The best things you can do to make do with less truck are bring less stuff with you (lol), and put as much weight as you can into the trailer, so long as you don't exceed the gross weight rating of the trailer. Only ~13% of the weight you put in the trailer, properly distributed, will count towards payload on the truck. So things like bikes, get those into the trailer. Beer, luggage, etc, same. Get the tow vehicle down to just the people and dogs basically

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Old 05-23-2019, 04:06 PM
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Our friend with the ranch and no stock may have been being just a wee bit sarcastic in his post
First of all, I love that interpretation, LOL, because that is definitely me. For real. (with a 1/2 acre "ranch").

But I absolutely was not being sarcastic. My first thought after reading "A lot of the Lariat and Platinum trucks only have 1100ish lbs of payload", was, oh crap, what changed now (WTF).

So I am relieved to know that the yellow sticker means what it says. and somebody just put up a typo/misfire.

But after years of reading about GVWR, GVM, GAWR, GCWR, GTWR, Curb Weight, Dry Weight, etc, etc, etc, I find it difficult to keep up. So I would not be surprised if numbers change, I just want to know how they did.
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Old 05-28-2019, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by fordmedic48 View Post
If your looking at towing that kind of weight or thinking you might you should go to a 250 Diesel.
I would not advise a F250 diesel. There is a huge weight penalty paid by putting a diesel in a 3/4 ton truck. My 2014 F150 3.5L with HDPP has 2286# cargo capacity. There are some diesel F250's that are not much higher. A F250 with the 6.2L gasser would have greater than 3200# CC.

If anyone is contemplating a diesel, I would suggest they go straight to the F350 model. You get full use of the diesel with this size truck.
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