Topic Sponsor
Towing/ Hauling/ Plowing Discuss all of your towing and/or cargo moving experiences here.
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

Travel Trailer Towing Questions

 
Old 06-03-2012, 10:20 AM
  #1  
Grand Master...of nothing
Thread Starter
 
Platinum_Dawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Nicholls GA
Posts: 413
Received 33 Likes on 17 Posts
Default Travel Trailer Towing Questions

I'm looking for a little advice and help. We are planning to purchase our first travel trailer (RV) and want to know what is a safe weight to tow. The original unit I was considering has a dry weight of 4,910lbs with a carrying capacity of 1,635lbs equaling a total potential weight of 6,545lbs at a 28ft length. The unit we are now considering is a little bigger at 5,995lbs dry weight and carrying capacity of 1,805lbs equaling a total potential weight of 7,800lbs at 30ft in length.

I have a 2011 Platinum SCrew 4x4, 5.0 engine, 3.73 gears that ford website says is equipped for 9,300lbs of towing. The total of 7,800lbs is well within that limit and probably won't weight that much with the tanks empty. What does everyone think, is this a safe weight to tow "regularly?" Oh, the hitch weight is 610lbs and I will be installing a weight distribution hitch. Any advice, suggestions or recommendations is very much appreciated!
Platinum_Dawg is offline  
Old 06-03-2012, 10:28 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
iTrader: (2)
 
kozal01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 7,346
Received 264 Likes on 128 Posts
Default

What do you consider "regularly"? I pull a 5700 pound dry weight, 7700 GVWR 30' TT several time a summer with my 05 supercrew and it pulls it very well so I would suspect that your newer truck would pull that just as well or better. Although that weight is within the limits of the truck its still not something I would want to subject the truck to every weekend. Also once you hang almost 700 pounds off your bumper, even with the WDH you need to keep in mind that takes away from your trucks payload which can easily be eaten up with a load of firewood, coolers, grills ect. I was looking for used to keep it in my budget when I bought our TT so I had to get an older camper but If I was buying new I would have opted for a lighter pull.
kozal01 is offline  
Old 06-03-2012, 10:47 AM
  #3  
Grand Master...of nothing
Thread Starter
 
Platinum_Dawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Nicholls GA
Posts: 413
Received 33 Likes on 17 Posts
Default

We won't pull every weekend but likely once a month. My wife has 4 day weekend every 3rd week so that's likely how often, while maybe nit as frequently during winter but we do enjoy the mountains so...

Just don't want to overdo it and kill my truck!
Platinum_Dawg is offline  
Old 06-03-2012, 10:56 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Tonopah. AZ.
Posts: 3,383
Received 472 Likes on 311 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Platinum_Dawg View Post
We won't pull every weekend but likely once a month. My wife has 4 day weekend every 3rd week so that's likely how often, while maybe nit as frequently during winter but we do enjoy the mountains so...

Just don't want to overdo it and kill my truck!
Your good to go with w a WDH you will be well within the the safe tow rating of your truck be sure you have a proper working trailer brake set up and as a personal thing I like to keep my towing speed to 65 MPH or less. watch your temps and fluids. I also recomend full synthetic lube in the engine and differential. Enjoy
bubbabud is offline  
Old 06-03-2012, 11:04 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
JCooper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 715
Received 41 Likes on 29 Posts
Default

It sounds like you already did the appropriate homework. You are correct in going by the combined weights of the trailer (dry weight and load cap.). Many people make the mistake of just going by dry weight. When we bought our travel trailer (27'), the dealer looked up my truck as equipped to find the tow capacity. This info is also in the trucks owners manual.

As long as you are not towing too close to the trucks capacity (and it doesn't seem like you are) you should be fine. Your gears are already low enough. Your truck should be able to tow much more frequently than once a month anyway. not sure if you mentioned having a tow package... that get you a trans cooler also.

Just stay below your tow capacity, set your distribution hitch and sway bar properly, and you will be in good shape for any weekend excursion. Good luck.
JCooper is offline  
Old 06-03-2012, 11:14 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 291
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 6 Posts
Default

Both will be fine. Make sure that the WD you get will include built in sway control. Like an Equalizer or Reese DC. You trucks built in sway controll feature does nothing untill your in trouble. A good WD with built in sway will keep your TT more in line with the truck, like when passing or getting passed by semis or in windy conditions. Also at 7800lbs that TT will have a tongue weight of 780lbs min to 1170lbs max. The best is somewhere in between like 975lbs. I tow a 7200lb TT and the hitch weight is 850-900lbs. Those brochure weights don't include the battery or full propane tanks. Plus the WD hitch will add another 100+ or -lbs to the tongue. Also they don't include the gear you put in the front cargo bay. Check you drivers door yellow sticker for you max cargo load rating. Also as a general rule you could figure about 1000lbs of gear added to the TT. And those dry brochure weights are usually 200+lbs low. So you'll need to add a little for that. Good luck with your trailer hunting.
RRF150 is offline  
Old 06-03-2012, 11:24 AM
  #7  
Grand Master...of nothing
Thread Starter
 
Platinum_Dawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Nicholls GA
Posts: 413
Received 33 Likes on 17 Posts
Default

I have been told the equalizer wd hitch is the way to go so that's what I'm planning on getting. And yes my Platinum come equipped with towing package and integrated trailer brake controller. I think I'm gonna be fine with the 7,800 because that is total gross weight loaded out which I probably will never be. I have been talking with folks we know about RV'ing and many never even tow with anything in their tanks...some "rough it" without full hookups and have to tow very short distances with fresh tank full and then grey and black to dump but just short hauls.

The unit we are looking at is a Keystone Outback 274RB. It has the floor plan we like and features we think suit us best while remaining light enough to pull comfortably with my F150.
Platinum_Dawg is offline  
Old 06-03-2012, 01:53 PM
  #8  
ObD
Platinum Ego Boostin
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: FloRida
Posts: 55
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Your limiting factor is going to be payload. Check your F150 door sticker. That number includes all your options, a full tank of gas, and 150 lbs for the driver. Your hitch weight of 610 lbs will have to be subtracted from that number. What is left is what you can load in the truck minus any options/aftermarket stuff installed after delivery. I'm guessing that your hitch weight of 610 lbs is about 50-60% of your payload on the door sticker. Not much left for passengers and stuff in the truck.
ObD is offline  
Old 06-03-2012, 02:11 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
moosedog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Vancouver B.C.
Posts: 105
Received 19 Likes on 9 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by RRF150 View Post
Both will be fine. Make sure that the WD you get will include built in sway control. Like an Equalizer or Reese DC. You trucks built in sway controll feature does nothing untill your in trouble. A good WD with built in sway will keep your TT more in line with the truck, like when passing or getting passed by semis or in windy conditions. Also at 7800lbs that TT will have a tongue weight of 780lbs min to 1170lbs max. The best is somewhere in between like 975lbs. I tow a 7200lb TT and the hitch weight is 850-900lbs. Those brochure weights don't include the battery or full propane tanks. Plus the WD hitch will add another 100+ or -lbs to the tongue. Also they don't include the gear you put in the front cargo bay. Check you drivers door yellow sticker for you max cargo load rating. Also as a general rule you could figure about 1000lbs of gear added to the TT. And those dry brochure weights are usually 200+lbs low. So you'll need to add a little for that. Good luck with your trailer hunting.
upgraded to a reese dual cam e/q last summer, made a big difference in sway control and handling. trailer weighs @ 6500 lbs. loaded plus what ever i load in the box. my tow rating is for over 11000 lbs, would never get that close to that nuimber ! i have the max t/t package as well as a set of firestone air bags... happy rv'ing !
moosedog is offline  
Old 06-03-2012, 02:19 PM
  #10  
2011 XLT XTR SCrew 4x4 EB
 
BoostedFitz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Posts: 470
Received 21 Likes on 11 Posts
Default

Check out the Husky Centreline hitch. That's what I use and like it so far. Built in sway control that dosen't rely on friction. No bolts to make Sure are torqued right for sway to work.

Just a thought. I am by no means an expert on this stuff.
BoostedFitz is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Travel Trailer Towing Questions


Contact Us - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: