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Weight of TT - DRY vs GVWR vs DRY HITCH

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Old 12-06-2017, 04:05 PM   #1
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Default Weight of TT - DRY vs GVWR vs DRY HITCH

Looking to buy our first travel trailer. However I'm a bit confused on the overall way to read the printed specs of these two trailers.

Ideally I'd like to be between 10-15% hitch weight.

What's got me a bit confused is the "dry hitch weight" over the "Dry axle weight" which gives you the overall dry weight of the trailer.

How do these numbers fluctuate as the trailer is loaded up with clothes, food, beer, water? (Water be picked up near the destination if not at the destination to cut down on paying to haul water for extended distance). Will the hitch weight ALWAYS be at least 1,200 lbs from unloaded to loaded? Or will more weight in the back help balance out and keep that 1,200 hitch weight from rising?

These are the two trailers we're interested in.. more so the 333VFK (because of the outdoor kitchen).


The truck is a 2017 F150 SCREW 4x4 Maxi-tow 3.5EB 10 speed. 12,200 tow with WDH rating of 1,220 lbs (funny how it's in line with the max tow). Payload is fine.


Focus is how to calculate estimated trailer tongue weight when loaded based on numbers. I'm not worried about the trucks. Just how to read/calculate the trailer estimates.
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Old 12-06-2017, 04:23 PM   #2
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The weights to watch out for would be your payload and rear axle max weight rating. Those will be your limiting factor. They're the ones that keep us to a 5500 lb TT.
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Old 12-06-2017, 04:36 PM   #3
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Dry Hitch Weight doesn't count the LP tanks or battery. At 1200 pounds you are already well over the rated hitch limit when you add the LP Tanks, Battery and your Weight Distribution Hitch.

My $0.02, look for something with a dry hitch weight of no more than 850 lbs. which then gives you 370 pounds below your hitch rating to account for the additional weight of LP Tanks, Battery and WDH.
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Old 12-06-2017, 04:38 PM   #4
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Hmm, you might not like hearing what I think most will say. So that it can be explained, please provide the payload rating (yellow sticker on driver's door jamb) and wheel base (5ft or 6.5ft bed). Let us know if your truck has the HD payload package. The numbers on the receiver hitch sticker, they reflect what the hitch is capable of, not so the rest of the truck. Do you know where the Fresh water tanks are located on the trailers (or at least where the fill is)? Are you planning on towing across town twice a year for a seasonal site, or all over the place full timing?
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Old 12-06-2017, 06:36 PM   #5
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Those are WAY too much trailer for any 1/2 ton, no matter how much payload it has!!!!! Don't let anyone say otherwise.

At 36' you are just asking to be knocked around. Also consider that the empty weight alone is 2000+ pounds more than your truck.

The safe towing limit for the F150 IMO is no more than 30'. Mine is 28' and on the 2016 is border line(the 2014 handled better).

This falls into that old adage, just because it can, doesn't mean it should.
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Old 12-06-2017, 08:36 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaf-Peeper View Post
Hmm, you might not like hearing what I think most will say. So that it can be explained, please provide the payload rating (yellow sticker on driver's door jamb) and wheel base (5ft or 6.5ft bed). Let us know if your truck has the HD payload package. The numbers on the receiver hitch sticker, they reflect what the hitch is capable of, not so the rest of the truck. Do you know where the Fresh water tanks are located on the trailers (or at least where the fill is)? Are you planning on towing across town twice a year for a seasonal site, or all over the place full timing?
I listed all relative numbers.


I'm not sure where the tanks are located at.. being a nicer trailer they could really be anywhere on this trailer (with pumps). I'll need to inspect the trailer in person to know where the tanks are but if memory serves me right - they are behind the axles. I have reached out to the specific group so I can get detailed info instead of wondering the RV lot.

The goal is at least once a month during the season (Pacific Northwest, Oregon Coast) which is a 6 month window. I estimate that we'll probably sneak in about 8 or so trips a year. Typically within a 200 mile radius. It's only an hours drive to the coast for us.. at that point it's just a matter of driving North/South on the coast line for a camp site.

I tried the full-time deal LOL the wifey said no. Wants a house made of sticks



I'm well aware of the size of trailer to the truck. Being a fleet manager I have seen a wide range of Ford trucks from F150 to F750 and what their capabilities are. Tho flatbed trailers are a different animal compared to a travel trailer..

My F150 is leased. I'd rather push its legal limits now and trade up in 1.5 years to a bigger vehicle than buy smaller trailer now and NOT be happy with our choice. Trailers are much harder to flip (without loss) than trucks. This trailer(s) have nearly everything we'd like. We wouldn't be happy with anything less..
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Old 12-06-2017, 08:50 PM   #7
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Holy poop! 37'?
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Old 12-06-2017, 08:57 PM   #8
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Before anyone else says it's too much trailer for the truck - I am VERY well aware of the build of the F-Series trucks from 150-750. It was my job.

My FOCUS is on the trailer side and how weight distribution is played.
Please - I'm only looking for knowledge to better understand how travel trailer weights work & understanding listed specs. To put it to rest - the vehicle CAN tow the trailer, no problem. Will it be as comfy as a DRW 450? Not at all. But it'll do it. If the F150 isn't too comfortable it can be swapped out FAR easier than a trailer can. The focus is the trailer - NOT the tow vehicle.


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Old 12-06-2017, 09:16 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simnut View Post
The weights to watch out for would be your payload and rear axle max weight rating. Those will be your limiting factor. They're the ones that keep us to a 5500 lb TT.

Payload may or may not be limiting factor with current gen trucks. Pretty easy to hit GCWR before you're over payload.

Previous gen trucks, yeah, its all about payload.

OP: the LP tanks will not be 'anywhere', usually they are on the front and most of their weight becomes tongue weight because they are so close to the hitch. Two 30lb cylinders would be common so another 60lb. Battery is often up front too...then figure 1000lb of your stuff when loaded (not including water). How you load it determines how much more tongue weight that adds.

If you add 1000lb of 'stuff' to the top one, you're pretty much at the 9995 lb limit. Is it possible to stay below 1200lb tongue weight? Maybe if you load everything perfectly...and you'll end up at 12% tongue weight at most.

Last edited by 11screw50; 12-06-2017 at 09:24 PM.
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Old 12-06-2017, 09:16 PM   #10
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Isn't this the second or third thread you've tried to tell us you can pull the trailer when everyone one else says you can't?

I say stop asking questions because you don't want to hear the answers and then go do whatever you want.
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