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How much weight does it take to squat the rear?

 
Old 10-23-2018, 08:55 AM
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Default How much weight does it take to squat the rear?

Hopefully this makes sense: I'm trying to get a good estimation of how much weight I've been towing and hauling recently, and was wondering if anyone had ever taken any measurements to see how much weight in the bed it takes to make the back of the truck squat a certain amount. Yes, factors like suspension and bed length will affect this, but I'm tryin to get to within a few hundred pounds. Every weekend, I've had the 5.5' bed of my '04 SCREW Fx4 loaded to just above the rails with unsplit white oak, and towing my 5.5'x10' single axle trailer filled ~18-20" deep (on average) with the same. Initial estimates of my weight were ~3500 lbs, but after looking up the density of fresh white oak, it seems I may be around 5500 lbs, possibly more. I know over the summer I hauled a couple of loads of 1000 lbs of concrete sand, and it didn't seem to make the truck squat as much as the wood. I'll try to remember to take a picture this weekend, but I'd estimate the squat to be 3-4" in the back. I know the trailer had squatted enough to put the axle against the deck. Thanks in advance.
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Old 10-23-2018, 09:01 AM
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I suggest you visit a scale. You're very likely exceeding the truck's capacities. In your post, you're combining the wood weight between the trailer and the truck, I suggest you figure out (or go to a scale) the weight of each. Then, examine the payload sticker on your door jamb. Subtract any mods made to the truck, then your weight, any other passengers weight, and the weight of the wood in the bed. What's left is the payload of the trailer you can tow. Divide it by 13% for average tongue weight. I suspect you'll find that you're both over payload in the truck alone, and then way over payload with the trailer. Or, if you make payload with the truck, what's left will show you that you're over payload with the trailer.
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Old 10-23-2018, 11:15 AM
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If I assume you stacked the oak in your bed comprising 75 cu ft, that is 59% of a cord. A cord of green white oak weighs 5,500 #, so your bed carried 3,222#. You can probably assume a weight reduction of 75% if the wood is seasoned. What is your truck payload rating?
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Old 10-23-2018, 11:25 AM
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I tend to agree that you need to get to a scale, you are most likely over Payload and perhaps rear axle rating.

Totally different truck - but 525lb on the ball of my 2015 F150 will take the rake out of the truck. The rear tends to drop about 1.5 to 1.75in w/ that much weight on the back.

I have put a bed full of red oak in the truck and seen about the same amount of squat in the back if not a bit more as compared to the boat.The 525lb is verified /w a tongue weight scale - I didn't weigh it with the wood in the back.

I don't see how you could have the bed loaded up with an additional 550lbs of weight on the ball (5,500 * .10) and not be over payload or Rear Axle Rating.

Here are pics of both setups.





Last edited by Jeff1024; 10-23-2018 at 11:27 AM.
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Old 10-23-2018, 04:18 PM
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My guess would be more like 1/3 of a chord of wood. I'd guess the weight at about 1200 to 1700 lbs in the truck. I'm not sure of the trailer.
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Old 10-23-2018, 04:42 PM
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Plenty of room before bump stops!!
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Old 10-23-2018, 06:53 PM
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Thanks for some of the actual data. Sure I could visit a scale, but then I wouldn't have bothered asking, nor am I going to bother getting to a scale at some point in a 200 mile trip. I know for a fact I've more than maxed out the trailer as its framing is bending slightly. I've probably exceeded the truck's rating, but that's fine, it won't break. I've put more than 5000 miles in it with loads like this; I no longer have the camper shell on the bed, but when I did, I used to stack than deck to ceiling with split oak, every empty spot filled, then load the trailer and drive the 200 miles home. I used to haul well over 2000 lbs in my '84 S10, once with a 2500 lb trailer almost 500 miles, so this Ford can definitely handle what I'm putting it through, I was just curious to estimate how much I'm putting it through.

Last edited by dukedkt442; 10-23-2018 at 07:21 PM.
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Old 10-23-2018, 07:46 PM
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As I can't seem to be able to edit previous posts; the white oak is un-split, green. Most pieces in the trailer are 24" or greater diameter disks, 12-18" thick. The bed had ~12" diameter pieces up to 24" long, as I didn't feel like lifting anything larger up into the truck. My estimate is 5500-6000 lbs, but could be more.

Mostly, was just curious if there's any data on a "weight:squat" ratio out there. Don't have a pic hitched to the truck, just hitched to the tractor to move into the backyard. Made the little tractor pull a wheelie most of the trip, as its hitch is above the axle so it wanted to rotate!



Last edited by dukedkt442; 10-23-2018 at 08:18 PM.
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Old 10-23-2018, 08:31 PM
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It's not about whether or not the chassis can handle the load, it's about loading the chassis safely. All it takes is that person cutting you off on the highway, your excess weight causes a tire to blow while you are emergency braking/maneuvering, or your rear end slides out... you end up being at fault for all damage caused by your vehicle and load, and your insurer won't cover it because you were overloaded. If having your wages garnished for hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages is fine with you... no, no, just don't do it, I don't want my family maimed or killed by your ignorance.

No one has a 'squat chart', because that is no way to judge the load, and the result would be different between the three different bed lengths, the three different cabs, the three different payload packages, 2x4 Vs 4x4, and topper Vs trifold cover Vs landau cover Vs sliider Vs open bed. Aged suspension Vs new. Bilstein shocks Vs oem. 6" drawbar Vs 8".The list goes on...
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Old 10-23-2018, 08:40 PM
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If all the pieces of wood are the same basic size/deminsions, just take a bathroom scale with you, weigh a few pieces to get an average and go from there. Or go weigh a few pieces you have already hauled home.
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