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F150 Hitch Reciever Capacity

 
Old 01-06-2018, 09:45 AM
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Default F150 Hitch Reciever Capacity

Does the hitch receiver capacity listed on the sticker include the weight of the weight distribution hitch?
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Old 01-06-2018, 09:52 AM
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yes. WDH also reduces your payload.
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Old 01-06-2018, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Pete1000 View Post
Does the hitch receiver capacity listed on the sticker include the weight of the weight distribution hitch?

Tongue weight (TW) and hitch weight are a bit confusing when a WD hitch is involved.


The TW weight limit sticker on the frame of the receiver is actually for all weight that is riding on the receiver, trailer TW plus the weight of the WD hitch and spring bars.


When weighing the trailer tongue to get actual TW with a WD hitch, mount the hitch head with shank to the coupler on the tongue and lay the spring bars across the tongue. When you weigh the tongue you'll get the weight that the hitch specs call tongue weight (TW).


If you leave the shank and hitch head in the receiver when you weigh the tongue, you'll get TW per the trailer specs, but not TW as intended by the hitch specs.
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Old 01-06-2018, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by smokeywren View Post
Tongue weight (TW) and hitch weight are a bit confusing when a WD hitch is involved.


The TW weight limit sticker on the frame of the receiver is actually for all weight that is riding on the receiver, trailer TW plus the weight of the WD hitch and spring bars.


When weighing the trailer tongue to get actual TW with a WD hitch, mount the hitch head with shank to the coupler on the tongue and lay the spring bars across the tongue. When you weigh the tongue you'll get the weight that the hitch specs call tongue weight (TW).


If you leave the shank and hitch head in the receiver when you weigh the tongue, you'll get TW per the trailer specs, but not TW as intended by the hitch specs.
That's an interesting take. Can you substantiate that from the standard hitch testing documentation? I only ask because there are specific definitions of hitch and tongue weight. And the standard definition of tongue weight is without the hitch. So if the receiver manufacturer and testing procedure intend to mark the maximum hitch weight why don't they call it that? Maybe it's spelled out in the standard test procedure. I just didn't see it last time I read through it.
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Old 01-06-2018, 02:52 PM
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The problem is that the torque applied by the WDH is not considered when TW is calculated for a receiver. TW is static, assuming a frictionless ball. The WDH shifts some of the actual TW to the other 2 axles. But the actual TW must be considered to remain within design specs. That's why the WDH spring bars must be included in a TW measurement, but NOT installed in their normal loaded state. Loading the bars actually INCREASES the effective TW by adding stress to the receiver. But a simple static weight scale under the truck's rear axle would make it appear opposite.

So to answer the original question: yes, you'd add the WDH's weight to the trailer tongue weight to find out if you're over the receiver's TW rating.
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Old 01-06-2018, 02:57 PM
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Guys - this isn't something that can be rationalized. It must be defined in the testing procedure. Other than citing the testing procedure, you're just spreading potential misinformation.
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Old 01-06-2018, 03:04 PM
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Maybe. But the testing procedure isn't an explanation of WHY that procedure is used, or how NOT using it will affect the readings IRW. And it's probably not written such that it would be easily-understood by a typical pickup owner. Our explanations are just that: explanations. Whether they're technically right or not could be debated for years. But they convey the answer the OP was looking for, and it's the right answer: add the WDH weight to the trailer TW.
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Old 01-06-2018, 04:14 PM
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The SAE j684 hitch test standard doesn’t include the weight of the draw bar or spring bars in they’re calculations, only tongue weight. SAE j2807 includes draw bar, spring bars ect. as required equipment and the weight is added to the TVTW ( Tow vehicle trailering weight) aka GVW.
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Old 01-06-2018, 05:05 PM
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Originally Posted by 8100hd View Post
The SAE j684 hitch test standard doesn’t include the weight of the draw bar or spring bars in they’re calculations, only tongue weight. SAE j2807 includes draw bar, spring bars ect. as required equipment and the weight is added to the TVTW ( Tow vehicle trailering weight) aka GVW.
Thank You for bring up the SAE J2807. This test from my understanding requires a 150lb driver and 150lb passenger and 75lbs for the WDH during the test. From my interpretation, the 300lbs for driver and passenger and the 75lbs for the WDH are ghost weights not included in the tire pressure/payload sticker. So a F-150 with a payload sticker of 2,000lbs has to be able to support a payload of 2,375lbs. If this is incorrect, please let me know with supporting docs.
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Old 01-06-2018, 05:34 PM
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If I remember correctly the payload sticker is the actual weight of the truck plus a full tank of fuel. Anything added at that point must be subtracted from the payload number on the sticker including driver weight. If you check the towing guide and subtract TWR from GCWR you get the minimum gvw the truck could possibly weigh with the required equipment and the 300 lbs driver and passenger.
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