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Fox 2.5 DSC Compression Settings

 
Old 05-12-2019, 10:18 PM
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Default Fox 2.5 DSC Compression Settings

Looking for your favorite Fox 2.5 DSC compression settings. I installed the 2.5s at all four corners but have been struggling to find the sweet spot for my 2017. My ride is fairly harsh compared to stock, I expected the ride to be more firm but it's sometimes unpleasant for passengers.

There's not much support or recommendations out there for the High and Low speed compression settings, so was hoping to hear what has worked for others - real life settings not infomercials. I live in the city with bad roads and pot holes but also like to hit it hard off road.

Starting with both ***** all the way open (full counterclockwise) I turn the blue high speed to about 7 or 9 clicks, and keep the gold low speed at 0 to 1 clicks for a nice and soft highway ride, but low speed suffers. Coilovers have been adjusted so truck has 2" of lift over stock in front. Also have Icon Delta upper control arms.

Soft pavement setting? High speed trail running setting? Low speed trail setting? Front/Rear settings, the same or different?




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Old 05-13-2019, 12:30 PM
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It does not help you are running a 20" tire. If you go to a 17" or 18" that will also make a big difference. What tire pressure are you running?
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Old 05-13-2019, 02:38 PM
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I dropped the pressure down to the Ford recomended 35 psi after my shop installed the new tires at 50 psi, that smoothed out the ride a bit. But I'd really like to hear what settings people are using for pavement vs. off road. I expected these coilovers and shocks to absorb bumps and pothols but I feel every imperfection on the road. If I adjust to all the way soft for HSC and LSC the truck bucks. Where's the happy medium?
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Old 05-13-2019, 10:43 PM
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I am fully open on low speed and 4 clicks in on the high speed.

I agree, fully open and I was bouncing too much. Big pot holes are absorbed way better and you hardly feel them. The little cracks or repair patches in the road are absorbed much better at those compared to fully open.

I also found this to be the sweet spot for both the highway and off road. At least what I have been able to try out so far. Too little high speed and the truck compressed too much and couldn't recover until I slowed down or stoppped.

Last edited by jdunk54nl; 05-13-2019 at 10:46 PM.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:00 AM
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one of the best ways to check tire pressure is to get the tires warmed up. Then put some chalk lines across the tire. Drive straight about 50-100 yds. Then check the chalk lines. They should be worn off completely across. If it is worn off in the middle, then decrease the pressure. If it is worn off on the outsides, then increase the pressure. Once done, record the final pressures in your OMM for future reference. This has served me well in the past. The last 2 sets of TOYO MT's I got over 50k miles on each set.
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Old 05-15-2019, 10:11 PM
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You will need to put some miles on them. It took a good 500miles of driving and hitting speedbumps, etc at a fairly good pace for them to settle in.

I'm on 2 click's low speed and 4 clicks high speed.
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Old 05-23-2019, 12:26 AM
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A lot of people are confused as to what 'high' and 'low' speed means.
It doesn't refer to the speed you're traveling, but rather the shock-shaft speed. Low speed is for round-edge bumps, controls brake dive,
High-speed is for things like trail chatter, square-edged bumps, and braking/acceleration bumps.
For every day driving, set the high-speed a couple clicks on the soft side of the middle setting(and leave it for now), and work on the low speed.
The easiest/quickest way to determine what YOU like, is go all the way OUT, and drive around. Then go all the way IN and drive around.
Starting with whichever you liked better, adjust two clicks in/out at a time(and drive) 'til you notice you've passed the sweet spot, and put it back.
Keep in mind too, the two circuits bleed over on to one-another, and as you start going stiffer on your compression, you'll start to lose some rebound damping(i.e. your rebound will start getting faster)
Unless you have a habit of hitting pot holes at speed, or like jumping curbs or islands, leave the high-speed alone. You'll notice it more when you go off-road
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Old 05-23-2019, 12:34 AM
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Originally Posted by yokev View Post
A lot of people are confused as to what 'high' and 'low' speed means.
It doesn't refer to the speed you're traveling, but rather the shock-shaft speed. Low speed is for round-edge bumps, controls brake dive,
High-speed is for things like trail chatter, square-edged bumps, and braking/acceleration bumps.
For every day driving, set the high-speed a couple clicks on the soft side of the middle setting(and leave it for now), and work on the low speed.
The easiest/quickest way to determine what YOU like, is go all the way OUT, and drive around. Then go all the way IN and drive around.
Starting with whichever you liked better, adjust two clicks in/out at a time(and drive) 'til you notice you've passed the sweet spot, and put it back.
Keep in mind too, the two circuits bleed over on to one-another, and as you start going stiffer on your compression, you'll start to lose some rebound damping(i.e. your rebound will start getting faster)
Unless you have a habit of hitting pot holes at speed, or like jumping curbs or islands, leave the high-speed alone. You'll notice it more when you go off-road
I re-read the thread and who was confusing shock speed with vehicle speed? Or do you just mean in general?
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Old 05-24-2019, 09:39 PM
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Originally Posted by jdunk54nl View Post
I re-read the thread and who was confusing shock speed with vehicle speed? Or do you just mean in general?
Most people.
You can't blame 'em...until you learn about [adjustable] suspension, why wouldn't you think it referred to vehicle speed?
I road raced motorcycles for a long time, which lead to owning a dealer and running a racing team.
I've rebuilt, and/or re-valved I don't know how many shocks and forks, and if I had a dollar for every set of forks or shock that I spun the clickers on for people, my personal assistant would be typing this for me
I've also had Fox CO's, Kings, stock FX4(back in '12) struts( can't remember at this point if they were a different p/n than the non-FX4 struts), RC's, and AFE/Sway Away CO's (just to name the ones I can remember off the top of my head at the moment) apart
For the most part,(IMO) you get what you pay for

Last edited by yokev; 05-24-2019 at 09:48 PM.
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