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Rim separation on my 2006 F150 - dissappointed in Ford

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Old 11-01-2007, 04:36 PM   #1
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Angry Rim separation on my 2006 F150 - dissappointed in Ford

Howdy fellow F150 owners, I hope all is well. I have just received some very disappointing news about my 2006 F150. Did you realize that you are only permitted to put “passenger vehicle” tires on your F150. The official word from Ford Canada is that the truck is ONLY rated for 6 ply tires or ‘P-rated’ tires (or ‘LT’ tires with a load range of ‘C’ or less (i.e., 6 ply or less)). This came about as one of my steel rims has suffered a major separation (1/3 of the diameter and more than ½ cm wide). In discussion with Ford, they stated that the separation was probably due to having too-aggressive a tire on the truck. I run with BF Goodrich All Terrain T/A (LT 285/70R17, Load Range D (8 ply)) – as recommended by many of the tire dealers. I have just replaced the tires since I’ve travelled 85,000 km in the past 14 months, most of this was highway driving on mountain roads. Many of the dealers suggested this tire and size. I wanted 8-ply tires since my coworkers have had two flats the same day on new 6-ply tires – the shrubs and sharp rocks on the gravel roads punctured the sidewalls too easily. I also wanted a little larger tire since the new F150s are too darn low and I was constantly hitting ground/rocks on the forestry roads (I’m a wildlife biologists that does a lot of field research).
I’m quite surprised by Ford’s response since I wasn’t asking for a warranty replacement - I just wanted to know if my other rims are safe and if this separation has been seen before. I had already purchased a new rim for the truck when I brought this to their attention. They seemed far more interested in pointing the finger at me saying it was my fault for having too-aggressive tires (i.e., standard ‘LT” tires) on the truck.
Given this huge limitation, how low the vehicle is, and the critical problem of not being able to put snow chains on the truck (directly from Ford technicians), really reduces the reliability of this vehicle off pavement. It is mandatory for many roads in British Columbia to have chains.
I should have gone with a F250 or F350 but I do not pull a trailer nor carry heavy loads – just bulky loads (300-400 lbs. max). The tire dealers said you shouldn't really pull heavy trailers with 6-ply tires. Anyway, I quite disappointed in the F150, my first new vehicle. Unfortunately, I now take my wife’s 1998 Toyota Tacoma since it has great clearance, 8-ply tires, and I can put snow chains on all 4 wheels if I need to (highly likely given the study sites I work on). I just hate leaving her with a vehicle that may not be safe. Although, we have had Ford inspect the other rims, every bump or pothole will leave me wondering if I need the rims inspected once again.
At least Transport Canada has taken this seriously and we currently have a Defects Investigator looking into the rim to see if this was a one-time defect or a more-chronic problem.
Anyway, just though you would like to know: since the F150 can’t support a truck tire, snow chains, is too low for off-pavement work, and possible can’t tow or carry much (as limited by 6-ply tires) I guess it really is a 'glorified passenger vehicle' (Ford’s words, not mine) and not really a truck (it just looks like a truck).
I’ll keep you posted on the results from Transport Canada’s investigation. I’ll try and attach a picture below).
Cheers,
Doug.
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Old 11-01-2007, 06:00 PM   #2
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Eh, this just can't be right.

I suggest that if there is a tire limitation, it should be due to the higher-ply tire exceeding the load rating of the rim, potentially allowing for unsafe conditions on the rim should the truck be loaded to the tire's limit.

Perhaps the higher-ply tire is anticipated to run at an air pressure higher than the rim's design?

I cannot for the life of me understand why the tire's construction alone would be a factor in the failure.

It would seem that the rim failure is related to a manufacturing defect.

Or, I could be wrong - but the situation described just doesn't sound right.

Last edited by wde3477; 11-01-2007 at 06:01 PM. Reason: grammar
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Old 11-02-2007, 12:01 AM   #3
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That pisses me off they should replace the rim for you. 8-plys would not split your rim lol that is a load of bs they are feeding you. Fords are great trucks and in my opinion more reliable then any other truck on the road. You just got unlucky in a 1 and 1000000 chances to get a defective rim. It sucks you couldn't have put that kind of luck towards the lotto. HAHA.
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Old 11-02-2007, 02:38 AM   #4
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since you are not trying to get a new rim out of it, don't worry about those idiots who told you that. If you were trying to get it replaced, you would just have to go over their heads, and keep bitching until you get something done.

like said above, it was probably just a one in a million chance.
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Old 02-16-2017, 09:28 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougB. View Post
Howdy fellow F150 owners, I hope all is well. I have just received some very disappointing news about my 2006 F150. Did you realize that you are only permitted to put “passenger vehicle” tires on your F150. The official word from Ford Canada is that the truck is ONLY rated for 6 ply tires or ‘P-rated’ tires (or ‘LT’ tires with a load range of ‘C’ or less (i.e., 6 ply or less)). This came about as one of my steel rims has suffered a major separation (1/3 of the diameter and more than ½ cm wide). In discussion with Ford, they stated that the separation was probably due to having too-aggressive a tire on the truck. I run with BF Goodrich All Terrain T/A (LT 285/70R17, Load Range D (8 ply)) – as recommended by many of the tire dealers. I have just replaced the tires since I’ve travelled 85,000 km in the past 14 months, most of this was highway driving on mountain roads. Many of the dealers suggested this tire and size. I wanted 8-ply tires since my coworkers have had two flats the same day on new 6-ply tires – the shrubs and sharp rocks on the gravel roads punctured the sidewalls too easily. I also wanted a little larger tire since the new F150s are too darn low and I was constantly hitting ground/rocks on the forestry roads (I’m a wildlife biologists that does a lot of field research).
I’m quite surprised by Ford’s response since I wasn’t asking for a warranty replacement - I just wanted to know if my other rims are safe and if this separation has been seen before. I had already purchased a new rim for the truck when I brought this to their attention. They seemed far more interested in pointing the finger at me saying it was my fault for having too-aggressive tires (i.e., standard ‘LT” tires) on the truck.
Given this huge limitation, how low the vehicle is, and the critical problem of not being able to put snow chains on the truck (directly from Ford technicians), really reduces the reliability of this vehicle off pavement. It is mandatory for many roads in British Columbia to have chains.
I should have gone with a F250 or F350 but I do not pull a trailer nor carry heavy loads – just bulky loads (300-400 lbs. max). The tire dealers said you shouldn't really pull heavy trailers with 6-ply tires. Anyway, I quite disappointed in the F150, my first new vehicle. Unfortunately, I now take my wife’s 1998 Toyota Tacoma since it has great clearance, 8-ply tires, and I can put snow chains on all 4 wheels if I need to (highly likely given the study sites I work on). I just hate leaving her with a vehicle that may not be safe. Although, we have had Ford inspect the other rims, every bump or pothole will leave me wondering if I need the rims inspected once again.
At least Transport Canada has taken this seriously and we currently have a Defects Investigator looking into the rim to see if this was a one-time defect or a more-chronic problem.
Anyway, just though you would like to know: since the F150 can’t support a truck tire, snow chains, is too low for off-pavement work, and possible can’t tow or carry much (as limited by 6-ply tires) I guess it really is a 'glorified passenger vehicle' (Ford’s words, not mine) and not really a truck (it just looks like a truck).
I’ll keep you posted on the results from Transport Canada’s investigation. I’ll try and attach a picture below).
Cheers,
Doug.
was there any news to the follow-up investigation ?
I as well have a 2004 Ford that has rim separation.
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Old 02-16-2017, 09:38 PM   #6
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I've got 10 plys on my ranger with no problem. Sounds like a fast talk to get out of a claim.

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Old 02-16-2017, 09:45 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogelio Small View Post
was there any news to the follow-up investigation ?
I as well have a 2004 Ford that has rim separation.
Since his one and only post was a decade ago I wouldn't expect a whole lot of response.

As to your question as long as you don't exceed rated air pressure (sometimes on the back of the spokes) and the rated load (always on the back) the wheel should be fine.

Most stock 1/2 ton wheels are rated for around 60 psi.
I suspect Ford CA concern was keeping someone from putting a tire with a higher max pressure on than the wheel. To much chance of someone using sidewall pressure.

As to why the wheel split. Could be damage, excessive pressure or manufacturing defect.
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