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Bilstein 5100's vs 5160's (rear)

 
Old 05-25-2019, 04:51 PM
  #31  
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It's all good. Hopefully you can get it dialed. You can always Google how to set psi in your tires and sometimes you'll find useful info like what I found with the psi increase. They went furthere into it talking about how keeping the cold to hot pressure in the single digits plays a role in thermal cycles to keep the tread from getting brittle and chunking, quite, comfort etc. Also, a lower pressure will help keep punctures at bay. There was a interesting video of a Cooper tire being ran over a spike until it punchered, patched and lowered pressure and redid time and time again. Mostly for off road but interesting none the less if your bored
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Old 05-25-2019, 06:22 PM
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I was just hesitant to drop the air too low...

As you should be! Remember, "Cold Inflation Pressures" are meant to be checked and set first thing in the morning, during the coolest part of the day for that particular season (depending on where you live).



just checked them, trucks been sitting all day and I was at 43 cold, dropped them down to 38 and drove 23 miles down the road at 70 mph, it’s 82 degrees out and humid and when I stopped, TPMS was saying 42...but, I will say it did feel smoother.

Ok, now we're getting somewhere.

You should check your tires again in the morning (after they have cooled to overnight lows) to be sure they don't start out too low (under 35 psi). You may not even like how squishy they might feel, and adjust to a 36, 37 or 38 psi Cold pressure. It's a process.



So based off that chart, if im picking up a load of lumber weighing 400 pounds, i should stop and add 10 PSI before doing so to the tires?

How do i find out what my weight is now without anything in the truck?

While we made some public scale suggestions, you don't set your pressure to the weight of your truck, you set it to the GAWR, something that never changes. What does the Manufacturer Data Plate on your truck say? for your Rear GAWR (rear axle weight rating)?


Another thing, that chart that Brokemillwright posted is a tire industry standard. All LT tires are made to the same tire construction specifications. They have to meet a standard. If they didn't, one brand of tire might handle so differently from another as to be dangerous in the hands of an unskilled driver. It stands to reason that all LT tires within each certain *size* regardless of brand can safely support so much weight at such-and-such air pressure.

Never run lower pressures that what are necessary to support your Rear GAWR (or whichever is the heavier rating of the two axles).

Invest in a portable 12V compressor and keep it in the truck so that you may make adjustments where necessary, such as refilling after airing down for off-road traction, or for the extra 10 lbs you mention for that heavy lumber load. And always re-check adjusted tire pressure the very next morning to be sure they're not too low for the heat of the day.
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Old 05-25-2019, 06:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Apples View Post
As you should be! Remember, "Cold Inflation Pressures" are meant to be checked and set first thing in the morning, during the coolest part of the day for that particular season (depending on where you live).






Ok, now we're getting somewhere.

You should check your tires again in the morning (after they have cooled to overnight lows) to be sure they don't start out too low (under 35 psi). You may not even like how squishy they might feel, and adjust to a 36, 37 or 38 psi Cold pressure. It's a process.






While we made some public scale suggestions, you don't set your pressure to the weight of your truck, you set it to the GAWR, something that never changes. What does the Manufacturer Data Plate on your truck say? for your Rear GAWR (rear axle weight rating)?


Another thing, that chart that Brokemillwright posted is a tire industry standard. All LT tires are made to the same tire construction specifications. They have to meet a standard. If they didn't, one brand of tire might handle so differently from another as to be dangerous in the hands of an unskilled driver. It stands to reason that all LT tires within each certain *size* regardless of brand can safely support so much weight at such-and-such air pressure.

Never run lower pressures that what are necessary to support your Rear GAWR (or whichever is the heavier rating of the two axles).

Invest in a portable 12V compressor and keep it in the truck so that you may make adjustments where necessary, such as refilling after airing down for off-road traction, or for the extra 10 lbs you mention for that heavy lumber load. And always re-check adjusted tire pressure the very next morning to be sure they're not too low for the heat of the day.
Front GAWR 1565kg/3450lb and rear 1724kg/3800lb, GVWR is 7,000 and max payload on the yellow sticker is 1863lb.
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Old 05-25-2019, 06:38 PM
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Ok. The higher-weight-rated axle, the one with the highest load capacity (and one you should not go over) can support 3800 lbs. That is your rear axle.

Now take your tire size: LT275/65-20 and according to the chart, that tire with only 35 psi in it can support 2080 lbs per tire. So, we double that, and we get 4160 lbs, which is a higher capacity at 35 psi than what you need for that axle. You're good. You have a 360 lbs buffer (left over). And I seriously doubt you'll ever carry 3800 lbs over your rear axle.

Remember, these LT tires can be run on 3/4 ton and some 1-ton trucks, too. An F150 is the lightest-weight (thanks to the alum body) of any domestic 1/2 ton truck.
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Old 05-25-2019, 08:23 PM
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Since we haven't heard from anyone in almost two hours, let's have a quiz.


"Now take your tire size: LT275/65-20 and according to the chart, that tire with only 35 psi in it can support 2080 lbs per tire. So, we double that, and we get 4160 lbs...
Q. Why do we double the figure of 2080 lbs

A. Because there are two tires on each axle; one on each side. The two tires together should be capable of supporting the axle's GAWR of 3800 lbs. (In your case, the two tires together at 35 psi can support 4160 lbs, and they can support heavier weight with an increase in inflation pressure).


Q. Why is it necessary to check tire air pressure in the coolest part of any day?

A. Because with every 10 degrees F ambient tire temperature change, there is a 1 psi pressure change. 2 degrees warmer? 2 psi higher. Tire temps are affected by outside air temperature, sitting in the sun and/or rolling down the road.

Your tire pressure drops 3 psi, 4 psi just from sitting overnight.

Last edited by Apples; 05-25-2019 at 08:55 PM.
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Old 05-28-2019, 02:40 PM
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And again, this perfectly aligns with what Ford recommends as well. I'm getting LT 275/70r18 ridge grapplers today and will be running at 35 psi.

I don't know why anyone would listen to Nitto for what psi to run. Of course they are going to recommend a high pressure, because it is the safe answer. The truth is, you can run 35 psi on a LT tire with a non-HDPP F-150, but you'd have to run a high psi on an F-250. It's all truck specific, not tire specific.
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Old 05-28-2019, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by redranger04g View Post
And again, this perfectly aligns with what Ford recommends as well. I'm getting LT 275/70r18 ridge grapplers today and will be running at 35 psi.

I don't know why anyone would listen to Nitto for what psi to run. Of course they are going to recommend a high pressure, because it is the safe answer. The truth is, you can run 35 psi on a LT tire with a non-HDPP F-150, but you'd have to run a high psi on an F-250. It's all truck specific, not tire specific.
People might listen to Nitto because they literally designed and built the tire in question. That's not exactly a bad reason to listen to them. And this is even when they know what vehicle it will be on.

Maybe that isn't the best way to do it, once you do your research, but it's not like that is an unfathomable reason
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