Topic Sponsor
2015 - Present Ford F150 General discussion on the latest generation Ford F150 truck.
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

In defense of the 2.7 ecoboost

 
Old 04-17-2019, 12:17 PM
  #241  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,318
Received 401 Likes on 282 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by montanaman View Post
I didnít intend to fire you up, but the common sense says that if you take a teeny 165 inch motor, and work it like a 390, that you are pushing it hard.

Now if the primary use for your truck truck is to cruise the kids to school, you wonít overstress it.

Hook up a trailer full of dirt behind it, and run it at boost and it will pull it, up hill and down hill if the turbos are spinning.

They are too new yet to see what the long term results are, but Iím thinking that my advice of not overworking them is solid.

But if you think they are a Cummins Cargomaster Diesel, go right ahead!��
Based on the punishment Ford put the 2.7 through during development, I would feel better about pushing this engine hard over any of the others. Jus sayin...
dalola is offline  
Old 04-17-2019, 12:34 PM
  #242  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 645
Received 87 Likes on 57 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by dalola View Post
Based on the punishment Ford put the 2.7 through during development, I would feel better about pushing this engine hard over any of the others. Jus sayin...
you mean the Baja 500? I feel like they thrashed the 3.5 harder than the 2.7 at-least in their marketing materials.
kehyler is offline  
Old 04-17-2019, 02:59 PM
  #243  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Memphis TN
Posts: 1,755
Received 260 Likes on 213 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by 2017bluetruck View Post
I'm not completely sure but isn't the 3.0 a developed Australian 2.7 diesel dating past 2005? Both are compacted iron graphite V6 but the Aussie version has external differences at least in appearance. Irregardless the 2.7 EB has a block much more closely related to diesel production. KM
the australian 2.7L diesel is a inline 5 cylinder and I think it dates back more than 2005. The 3.0 Powerstroke/Lion engine started development while ford owned Land Rover and it started off as a smaller displacement model of 2.4L since that was at one time an EU tax break point. It was always intended to be the engine to compete with Fiat Chrysler's Ecodiesel, and the GM 4 cylinder duramax (which just recently saw use in the US). I believe in the block design however - they must have been thinking about the gas DI motor too since there are alot of similarities. The heads and other bits are some different and the diesel seems to use a timing belt - which honestly still surprises me but it is low HP though.

Originally Posted by montanaman View Post
I didnít intend to fire you up, but the common sense says that if you take a teeny 165 inch motor, and work it like a 390, that you are pushing it hard.

Now if the primary use for your truck truck is to cruise the kids to school, you wonít overstress it.

Hook up a trailer full of dirt behind it, and run it at boost and it will pull it, up hill and down hill if the turbos are spinning.

They are too new yet to see what the long term results are, but Iím thinking that my advice of not overworking them is solid.

But if you think they are a Cummins Cargomaster Diesel, go right ahead!��
I would partially agree with you but you had to mention a 390. a ford 390 Ci V8 is used in what device they've produced in the last 10 years as I can't think of one. And no the 390 of old is not what the 6.2L gas mill was. The 2.7L while working hard is outfitted with the right kit to do so. Forged Pistons with oil cooling jets, forged and offset connecting rods with wide bearing caps, high nickel content bearing, lighter valve train, etc.

and it's in a block that happily tolerates significant cylinder pressure - more so that is safe for an AL block with water jackets and a cylinder bore hardness that is much higher than that of the lined AL blocks. SO yes it's working hard but it's got the right PPE to tolerate the job. Something the 5.4L triton mills of the day didn't have.


Originally Posted by kehyler View Post
you mean the Baja 500? I feel like they thrashed the 3.5 harder than the 2.7 at-least in their marketing materials.
yes but it's the 3.5L HO mill that goes in the Raptor - so that is probably why.
Napalm is offline  
Old 04-17-2019, 03:14 PM
  #244  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 325
Received 81 Likes on 55 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Napalm View Post
yes but it's the 3.5L HO mill that goes in the Raptor - so that is probably why.
I assume he's talking about this test. It was a normal 3.5 and not the HO.

https://news.pickuptrucks.com/2011/0...ooks-like.html
RX1Cobra is offline  
Old 04-17-2019, 04:37 PM
  #245  
Senior Member
 
SnowHater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Cold, Cold Western Michigan
Posts: 301
Received 53 Likes on 35 Posts
Default

I found the end. I just wish my 2.7 would get better MPG. To anything I have owned over 30 years, it sucks gas like crazy.
SnowHater is offline  
The following users liked this post:
Bigblockchevy (05-13-2019)
Old 04-17-2019, 05:08 PM
  #246  
FORD lifer
 
montanaman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Big Sky Country
Posts: 847
Received 87 Likes on 73 Posts
Default

[QUOTE=Napalm;6169563]the australian 2.7L diesel is a inline 5 cylinder and I think it dates back more than 2005. The 3.0 Powerstroke/Lion engine started development while ford owned Land Rover and it started off as a smaller displacement model of 2.4L since that was at one time an EU tax break point. It was always intended to be the engine to compete with Fiat Chrysler's Ecodiesel, and the GM 4 cylinder duramax (which just recently saw use in the US). I believe in the block design however - they must have been thinking about the gas DI motor too since there are alot of similarities. The heads and other bits are some different and the diesel seems to use a timing belt - which honestly still surprises me but it is low HP though.



I would partially agree with you but you had to mention a 390. a ford 390 Ci V8 is used in what device they've produced in the last 10 years as I can't think of one. And no the 390 of old is not what the 6.2L gas mill was. The 2.7L while working hard is outfitted with the right kit to do so. Forged Pistons with oil cooling jets, forged and offset connecting rods with wide bearing caps, high nickel content bearing, lighter valve train, etc.

and it's in a block that happily tolerates significant cylinder pressure - more so that is safe for an AL block with water jackets and a cylinder bore hardness that is much higher than that of the lined AL blocks. SO yes it's working hard but it's got the right PPE to tolerate the job. Something the 5.4L triton mills of the day didn't have.


But Grandpa's 1972 F250 had a 390 - it was a 'Camper Special' I think, and if you could put that 390 in one of our modern F series pickups, you wouldn't be able to overstress it !

It was lazy - didn't rev high, and liked gas too, but you wouldn't overwork it !
montanaman is offline  
Old 04-17-2019, 05:11 PM
  #247  
Senior Member
 
2017bluetruck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 481
Received 151 Likes on 112 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Napalm View Post
the australian 2.7L diesel is a inline 5 cylinder and I think it dates back more than 2005. The 3.0 Powerstroke/Lion engine started development while ford owned Land Rover and it started off as a smaller displacement model of 2.4L since that was at one time an EU tax break point. It was always intended to be the engine to compete with Fiat Chrysler's Ecodiesel, and the GM 4 cylinder duramax (which just recently saw use in the US). I believe in the block design however - they must have been thinking about the gas DI motor too since there are alot of similarities. The heads and other bits are some different and the diesel seems to use a timing belt - which honestly still surprises me but it is low HP though.
Thanks for the correction, not a big diesel fan so do not follow other than occasional glimpses. KM
2017bluetruck is offline  
Old 04-17-2019, 06:32 PM
  #248  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 645
Received 87 Likes on 57 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Napalm View Post
the australian 2.7L diesel is a inline 5 cylinder and I think it dates back more than 2005. The 3.0 Powerstroke/Lion engine started development while ford owned Land Rover and it started off as a smaller displacement model of 2.4L since that was at one time an EU tax break point. It was always intended to be the engine to compete with Fiat Chrysler's Ecodiesel, and the GM 4 cylinder duramax (which just recently saw use in the US). I believe in the block design however - they must have been thinking about the gas DI motor too since there are alot of similarities. The heads and other bits are some different and the diesel seems to use a timing belt - which honestly still surprises me but it is low HP though.



I would partially agree with you but you had to mention a 390. a ford 390 Ci V8 is used in what device they've produced in the last 10 years as I can't think of one. And no the 390 of old is not what the 6.2L gas mill was. The 2.7L while working hard is outfitted with the right kit to do so. Forged Pistons with oil cooling jets, forged and offset connecting rods with wide bearing caps, high nickel content bearing, lighter valve train, etc.

and it's in a block that happily tolerates significant cylinder pressure - more so that is safe for an AL block with water jackets and a cylinder bore hardness that is much higher than that of the lined AL blocks. SO yes it's working hard but it's got the right PPE to tolerate the job. Something the 5.4L triton mills of the day didn't have.



yes but it's the 3.5L HO mill that goes in the Raptor - so that is probably why.
Where did you learn about the forged connecting rods and pistons? I hadn't heard that one before.

I'm also curious since you seem to know more than me about the 2.7 ecoboost. From a durability perspective, is there anything about the 2.7 ecoboost that is different from a 2.7 diesel? I'm just curious mostly.

Last edited by kehyler; 04-17-2019 at 07:21 PM.
kehyler is offline  
Old 04-17-2019, 07:28 PM
  #249  
Senior Member
 
Wrenchbender's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Rochester,NY
Posts: 217
Received 38 Likes on 36 Posts
Default

And the 2.7 has Offset Connecting Rods, Bowled Pistons, Wider Bearing Caps Higher Nickle content and water cooled Exhaust Manifold's
along with a Compound Graphite Iron Block for the Clyinder Walls and they put double row timing chain and the guides were strengthened
Lighter Valve Train
Wrenchbender is offline  
The following users liked this post:
mds (04-23-2019)
Old 04-17-2019, 08:43 PM
  #250  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,318
Received 401 Likes on 282 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by kehyler View Post
you mean the Baja 500? I feel like they thrashed the 3.5 harder than the 2.7 at-least in their marketing materials.
That was only part of the test. They also did a bunch of durability miles, did all kinds extreme pulling, and a bunch of other crazy stuff. Then ran baja, and drove it home, and tore it down live at the Detroit Auto Show. Ford was running the video for a while right as the new '15 F150 & 2.7 EB were being introduced. It might still be out there in cyber land somewhere. But it was crazy what all they put that engine through. I believe at the time, they said it was the most extreme engine test they'd ever done, for a production engine....they literally randomly pulled it off the line in Lima.

Though small, the 2.7 is built like the proverbial brick outhouse.Liter for liter, I'd put it up against anything as far as toughness & durability.
dalola is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: In defense of the 2.7 ecoboost


Contact Us - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: