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Old 09-13-2013, 09:47 PM   #21
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The more strands the better. Think of it like lanes of traffic. The more lanes the better traffic moves. The multiple thin stands allow more current to move down the path. Thus thicker stands provide more resistance. My first major was electrical engineering, before switching to finance.

By the way, awesome write up! With the step by step pictures, you really can't go wrong!

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Old 09-22-2013, 10:51 PM   #22
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I don't much care for the very high strand counts. It is flexible but wears much easier. The resistance of a 1ga wire over 10-12ft is pointless to argue over if you are using copper. They are essentially the same when talking about this application.

Anyways; heres some math/physics for the nerds
For No. 12 AWG Table 8 of the NEC does list two different DC resistances for
stranded and solid copper.

DC resistance per 1000 feet for solid is 1.93 ohms

For stranded the DC resistance is given as 1.98 ohms per 1000 feet.

So solid should have a slightly higher ampacity.

If we use Table 310.16 of the NEC to determine RCA and substitute into the
Ampere calculation we can find the approximate differences in ampacity.

From Table 310.16 using 75 degrees C as the ambient.

I = 25 amperes, TC = 75 degrees C, and TA = 30 degrees C and RDC = 1.98 ohms
per 1000 feet or 0.00198 ohms per foot.

This converts to 1980 microhms.

From I (in kiloamperes) = SQRT(( TC-TA)/RDC*RCA))

Or

RCA=(TC-TA)/RDC*I*I

Or RCA = (75-30)/1980*0.025*0.025

RCA = 36 thermal ohm feet

For stranded, I = 0.025 kiloamperes from the table

For solid No. 12 copper

I (in kiloamperes) = SQRT ((75-30)/1930*36)

or I = 0.0254 kiloamperes

Then the solid No. 12 copper would have a 0 .4 ampere increase in ampacity.

This is a 0.4/25 *100 or only a 1.6 per cent increase.

Considering that ampacity tables are approximations, this increase in
ampacity does not exceed the error of approximation.
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Old 04-14-2014, 11:42 AM   #23
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Finished product.


Dual 1000CA interestate's with extra starter relay (so I am never without cranking power). These are fairly large and heavy batteries (both together are over 100lbs) so it was a very very tight fit and took pretty heavy duty angle iron to weld them in place. (bolted the angle to the factory bolt locations)
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Old 06-13-2014, 05:06 PM   #24
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Hey ibd where is the factor block to frame ground located?
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Old 06-13-2014, 05:18 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loudnproudford View Post
Hey ibd where is the factor block to frame ground located?
Factor block?
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Old 06-13-2014, 07:01 PM   #26
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Yeah the factory Brock to ground location
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Old 06-13-2014, 07:09 PM   #27
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Quote:
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Yeah the factory Brock to ground location
Lol oh I got you now. I did this to mine a year ago so I might be wrong but mine was the rear of the engine on the passenger side.
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Old 06-13-2014, 07:27 PM   #28
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Thank you!
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