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Old 01-27-2011, 02:09 AM   #1
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Default easiest way to perform my own front end alignment?

what is the easiest and quickest way to perform an alignment on an 89 f150? Im mainly wanting to check toe in, and i will be replacing my drag link soon so i will need the know how.
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Old 01-27-2011, 12:03 PM   #2
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When I put new tie rod ends on, I always count how many threads are showing on the old tie rod ends, and then I keep the same amount of threads showing on the new tie rod end. If that makes any sense at all.
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Old 01-27-2011, 12:04 PM   #3
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That will only get you close...take it to a shop...$50
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Old 01-27-2011, 01:09 PM   #4
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the shop is 200. thats why i wanna do it myself
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Old 01-27-2011, 01:14 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by techrep View Post
That will only get you close...take it to a shop...$50
Ditto! The Twin-I-Beam can be booger to align take it to a shop that knows how to handle this front end. Once you read below and see what is involved in a simple front end alignment you will start to understand why it costs so much. I was not kidding with the statement made at Cheyenne Frame and Axle when the mechanic told me the TTB, and TIB front ends help keep his family in eats.

I should point out as long as things are nice and tight and things get regularly greased the TIB will give you years and years of good service . But keep in mind the last TIB, or for that matter TTB front end was build in 1996 so the trucks running around with these front ends had a lot of miles on them and thing are starting to wear out.

What you are going to find out is the tools necessary to properly align a TIB front end will cost more the the $200 this shop wants to charge you.

http://www.i-car.com/pdf/upcr/procedures/su/su21.pdf

and this: (http://www.aa1car.com/library/bfe1096a.htm this is the source for the article below)

FORD
One thing to always check on Ford Twin I-Beam suspensions is ride height. If the front tires show camber wear and the ride height is below specs, you can bet the springs are sagging. And since the springs play a critical role in determining ride height (which affects camber), it does not make much sense to make a camber correction until the underlying problem has been fixed. The trick here is to replace or shim the sagging springs. If that fails to bring camber back within specs, you will have to do the following:

If the Twin I-Beam axles are the forged variety, which were used from 1965 through 1981, camber can be corrected by bending the axle with a hydraulic ram. To make a make a positive camber correction, a rigid work beam is slung under the axle from a pair of clevis blocks. A hydraulic ram is then placed under the middle of the axle. When pressure is applied, the ram bends the axle upward and tilts the knuckle down to increase camber. A slight amount of overbending is usually needed to compensate for spring back in the axle. A negative camber correction is made by removing the outboard clevis block and inserting a spacer between the work beam and axle. The hydraulic ram is then repositioned directly under the inner axle bushing. When pressure is applied, the work beam bends the outer end of the axle up which tilts the knuckle and decreases camber.


In 1982, Ford introduced lighter stamped steel axle Twin I-Beam suspensions on the F100 and F150 pickups. The same axle is also used on 1989 and up Ranger pickups. These axles should not be bent because doing so may weaken them. Camber corrections on the stamped steel Twin I-Beam axles can be made by installing an offset bushing in the upper ball joint. Before you replace this bushing, though, note its position and amount of offset (if any). This will help you determine how much additional offset is needed. Many aftermarket manufacturers offer zero degree sleeves which can be installed to zero out the ball joint stud location to a nominal centered position. After replacing the bushing, steer the wheel by hand to make sure the ball joint is not binding.


Caster corrections on Ford Twin I-Beam suspensions can be accomplished one of three ways: by replacing the same upper ball joint bushing as above on the 1987 and later applications, by replacing the radius arm bushing where the radius arm connects to the frame with an offset bushing, or by installing offset cam bushings where the through bolts attach the radius arms to the axles.

Another thing to watch out for on Ford F150 2WD pickups with the Twin I-Beam front suspension is rear ride height. Ford says any deviation in rear ride height with respect to stock ride height should be taken into account prior to aligning the front wheels. If the bed of the pickup sits higher or lower than stock because of helper or overload springs, or because of modifications that have been made to the vehicle (a wrecker, dumpster, towing a fifth wheel trailer, etc.), then the change in ride height and frame angle need to be computed to compensate for its affect on front caster and camber. Refer to a Ford manual for the ride height and frame angle caster/camber correction chart.

Ford says that modified trucks such as wreckers, dumpsters, trucks used for towing, and so on should be aligned to an "average" setting half way between a loaded and unloaded condition. To do this, ride height has to be measured with the truck loaded and unloaded. Subtract the loaded ride height from the unloaded ride height, divide the difference by two, add this amount to the loaded ride height, and then compare the number to the stock ride height to calculate the amount of compensation for camber and caster settings. Or, measure rear ride height loaded and unloaded, split the difference, then load the truck with just enough weight or tie down the rear suspension so rear ride height is at the mid-point. Then align the front wheels to the preferred specs.


When aligning a Ford truck that has rubber bonded socket (RBS) tie rod ends, loosen the tie rod stud, break the taper and allow the tie rod to center itself if you change toe more than 1/16 inch, otherwise you will get memory steer.

On 1980 to 1992 Ford Broncos and F150s, and 1989 to 1992 Ford F250s, a condition known as "recession steer" may be encountered. A left drift or pull that occurs while braking but produces no torque or pull in the steering wheel may be caused by the left radius arm front pivot bushings. It is important to make sure the pull is not due to a sticky brake caliper or contaminated brake linings. If the brakes appear to be working normally but there is a definite pull to the left when braking, the radius arm pivot bushings need to be replaced. Ford says it is okay to reuse the original nylon rear bushing spacer and rear bushing unless excessive wear is found. Torque the radius arm nuts to 80-120 lb. ft. Toe should be also be checked and reset to 1/32 inch toe-in.


If a pull still exists after replacing the radius arm pivot bushings, many aftermarket manufacturers sell offset radius arm bushings which allow you to change caster to eliminate the pull.


The newer Ford truck suspensions have pinch bolts which simplifies removal of the ball joint bushings. But do not assume the OE bushing has a zero degree offset. Many have 1 to 1-1/2 degrees of offset, usually in the camber direction. So if camber/caster corrections are needed, note the marking stamped on the OE bushing when it is removed so you can determine how much additional correction is needed. The first set of numbers stamped on the sleeve indicate the amount of caster, and the second set of numbers indicates camber. Subtract the numbers from your alignment readings to determine how much additional correction is needed.

Another way to figure how much correction camber/caster correction is actually needed on these applications is to pull out the OE bushing, install a zero offset bushing, then recheck the camber/caster readings to see how far they are off from the preferred specs. Any corrections would then be made by installing an aftermarket bushing with the required number of degrees of offset.


As you can see nothing is simple with this front end.
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Last edited by transmaster; 01-27-2011 at 04:13 PM.
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Old 01-27-2011, 01:26 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by 1996 Redneck F150 View Post
When I put new tie rod ends on, I always count how many threads are showing on the old tie rod ends, and then I keep the same amount of threads showing on the new tie rod end. If that makes any sense at all.
that will only help your toe in/out, not camber or caster
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Old 01-27-2011, 01:27 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by benbailey84 View Post
the shop is 200. thats why i wanna do it myself

200 for an alignment or to replace and alignment. You do want a shop to do it. Anything you do in your garage will just get you close. If not properly aligned your asking for tire wear problems and wasting gas. It could also be a safety issue.
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Old 01-27-2011, 03:33 PM   #8
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Yeah... I'm takin' mine to the shop. My eyes kinda glazed over during the first paragraph of that explanation.
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Old 01-27-2011, 03:39 PM   #9
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I am here to tell you from personal experience an out of whack TIB will eat up a set if tires real fast. You usually cup the tire on the inside part of the tread.
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My Carbon foot print is 57 tons per year, and that doesn't count my fart gas. I spend my carbon offset money on my 1995 F150 Flareside with a carbon spewing 5.0L V8.
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Old 01-27-2011, 03:44 PM   #10
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Yeah... I'm takin' mine to the shop. My eyes kinda glazed over during the first paragraph of that explanation.
Good choice. Believe me It would have ended up there anyway.

The thing that took me far to long to learn was except the fact I can not do everything. I have the ability but not the tooling and fixtures. The Twin-I-Beam requires a special set of tools to maintain them. Tools that are very costly.

Ford has always been problematic in past years with wheel alignment and not just in their trucks. Mustangs, Cougars, and their full sized sedans even with twin "A" arm front suspensions do not have full set adjustments available. The difference here is there are superior after market replacements available something that is not to be had with our TIB front ends.
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My Carbon foot print is 57 tons per year, and that doesn't count my fart gas. I spend my carbon offset money on my 1995 F150 Flareside with a carbon spewing 5.0L V8.

Last edited by transmaster; 01-27-2011 at 04:07 PM.
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Old 01-27-2011, 03:44 PM
 
 
 
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